Media

 
 
 Image courtesy of Innotech

Image courtesy of Innotech

A New Mindset Could Overcome ‘Bogus Academic Person Business Model’.

Academic research centers are perennially seeking new ways to get more work commercialized, from offices that are tasked with spotting marketable science to workshops meant to help scientists learn to think like entrepreneurs.

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How I Got My Job: Travis Block, Senior Scientist at StemBioSys, Inc.

Travis Block co-founded the adaptive cycling technology company MonoMano as an undergrad and the non-profit San Antonio Science while doing a PhD in biomedical engineering at the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio. He is now Senior Scientist at StemBioSys, Inc. We asked Travis why and how he founded his organizations and why he moved away from the bench.

 Photo courtesy of Xconomy

Photo courtesy of Xconomy

StemBioSys Lands Experimental UT Tech That Finds Young Stem Cells

 StemBioSys, the life sciences company with a system for growing stem cells, has licensed an experimental technology from University of Texas Health San Antonio that may help identify healthy young adult stem cells among large pools of other cells.

Video by SAMSAT

SAN ANTONIO MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LAUNCHES HEADQUARTERS AT THE PORT

SAN ANTONIO — Port San Antonio will be home to the San Antonio Museum of Science and Technology (SAMSAT).  The non-profit organization, created in 2016, will find an initial placement for their preview and headquarters location in the heart of the Port’s 1,900-acre campus.

 Image by William Luther/ San Antonio Express News

Image by William Luther/ San Antonio Express News

San Antonio the city of science, research, and discovery

When people hear someone mention San Antonio, they think of the Spurs, the River Walk and the Alamo.  No offense to those local treasures, but Travis Block wants to change that. He believes the city needs a new image. Block dreams of the day when San Antonio is universally viewed as a science mecca.

 Image courtesy of the San Antonio Express News

Image courtesy of the San Antonio Express News

F1000 Research - Science Fiesta follow-up

After publishing a paper about the efforts of the UT Health San Antonio Graduate Student Association and San Antonio Science, I did a short Q&A for the F1000 Research Blog.

 TEDx San Antonio 2016

TEDx San Antonio 2016

UT Health Career Advisory Workshop

Teresa Evans invited Lindsay Bira and I out to discuss our experience giving TED talks and transitioning from academia to students in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at UT Health San Antonio.

 Image courtesy of Frost and Sullivan

Image courtesy of Frost and Sullivan

World Stem Cell Summit 2016 (Frost and Sullivan Interview)

This video is courtesy of Frost and Sullivan, it is the full video of a brief interview with Senior Consultant Jane Andrews.

TEDx San Antonio

Travis takes a look at how communities choose to spend their money and question whether or not those decisions line up with their values.

President of San Antonio Science, Inc., a non-profit organization he co-founded to promote awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for science in San Antonio.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

 Image by Jennifer Navarrete

Image by Jennifer Navarrete

Jennifer Navarrete (TEDx Follow-up)

Following TEDx San Antonio, Travis Block went in-depth on his topic with Jennifer Navarrete.

 Photo by Charlotte Anthony

Photo by Charlotte Anthony

The Pipette Gazette (Travis Block and Guillermo Vela Speak at The Health Cell)

Graduate student Travis Block and career advisory council member Guillermo Vela spoke at The Health Cell last week about entrepreneurship and the next generation of scientists.

 KSAT 12 News

KSAT 12 News

KSAT 12 (TEDx Speaker Preview)

What would you spend $1 billion on?  Block wonders if spending should reflect the values of a community, and instead of putting money toward new baseball teams, maybe it should be spent on pressing issues communities face.

TEDx San Antonio (Speaker Promo)

We often dream about what we would do if we won the lottery, but we almost never think about how we might spend large amounts of money on our community.  The irony is that most people never win the lottery, but nearly everyone is asked to make decisions about massive community investments in the form of city bonds every few years.

  Photo: John Tedesco /San Antonio Express-News

Photo: John Tedesco /San Antonio Express-News

San Antonio Express News (Science Fiesta)

When people ask Travis Block what he does for a living, the conversation usually screeches to a halt when they learn he’s a scientist.

 

  NATHAN CONE   /   TPR

NATHAN CONE / TPR

Texas Public Radio (Science Fiesta)

A warm, sunny day greeted about 3,000 attendees to the first ever Science Fiesta on Saturday, March 5, a brand-new event conceived of and organized by Travis Block, graduate student at UT Health Science Center.

Family-friendly exhibits encouraged children and families to touch, play, and explore the natural world around them, whether it was viewing sunspots through a high-powered telescope, making music by tapping fruits and veggies attached to circuits, or handling a real human brain. Read the story from our friends at the San Antonio Express-News here.

 
 KENS 5

KENS 5

KENS 5 (Periodic Table)

San Antonio -- Graduate students from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and the Voelker Bioscience Teacher Academy are working with more than 100 K-12 schools in the San Antonio area to create what is believed to be the largest periodic table in the world, according to UTHSCSA.

 
 Atom Von Doos

Atom Von Doos

 

NEWS 4 SA (Science Fiesta)

SAN ANTONIO -- The largest periodic table in the world may now be here in San Antonio.

Today, our World Car Sky 4 helicopter was above Gustafson Football Stadium on the northwest side capturing students trying to set a new world record.

Graduate students from the UT Health Science Center worked with more than 100 K-12 students from local schools to create 12 by 15 feet size tarps of all 118 periodic elements. The entire periodic table is more than 22,000 square feet in size.

 
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KSAT 12 (Science Fiesta

SKY 12 was high above a group of San Antonio-area students on Wednesday as the came together to form the world's largest periodic table of elements at Gustafson Stadium. Justin Horne was on the field to find out what started the process.

 

Northside ISD (Science Fiesta

 

 
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KLRN (Science Fiesta)

 

Da Vinci Awards

THE MONOMANO CYCLING CONTROL SYSTEM OF ROCHESTER, NY ONE OF 15NOMINEES FROM AROUND THE WORLD SELECTED AS 2013 DA VINCI AWARDS FINALISTS.

 
 MonoMano, Inc.

MonoMano, Inc.

WXXI/NPR - Students at the University of Rochester Design Tricycle for Disabled

Five students at the University of Rochester have designed a tricycle control system that allows some people with disabilities to steer, brake and shift gears with one hand.

The project is getting international recognition and is a finalist for a da Vinci Award this month. Martin Szeto is one of the students behind the MonoMano system. They worked under the guidance of Professors Laurel Carney and Amy Lerner at the U of R's Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

 

University of Rochester - Student Team Wins an International da Vinci Award

A student team from the University of Rochester has received an international honor for its innovative approach to promoting accessibility for people with disabilities.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society's Michigan Chapter presented the five-member team with the Student of da Vinci Award at a gala event in Dearborn, MI last night.

 

Democrat and Chronicle - U of R student startup will enable stroke survivors and amputees to participate in world of cycling

Congratulations to MonoMano, a startup  recently formed by five graduating University of Rochester biomedical engineering students, for placing second this week at the Mark Ain Business Model Competition.

Their plan to commercialize a control system that enables someone that only has full use of one arm to steer and operate a recumbent cycle received $2,500 and much well-deserved momentum.

 
  J. Adam Fenster / UR Communication

J. Adam Fenster / UR Communication

Campus Times - BME graduates receive Da Vinci award

UR graduates’ senior biomedical engineering (BME) project, the MonoMano Cycling Control System, recently received the Student of Da Vinci Award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The team, which includes Jackson Block ’12, Sara Hutchinson ’12, Dominic Marino ’12, David Narrow ’12, and Martin Szeto ’12, has even created a company to market their device.